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Censured in Canada | Across The River By Iulia Nastase
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29 Mar Across The River By Iulia Nastase

SCREENING: MAY 28, 2017 – Sunday

ACROSS THE RIVER

 

DIRECTOR: Iulia Nastase

A girl in her twenties, Tincuta, from the Romanian region of Moldava, lives in a village that’s at the border with the Republic of Moldava, former Romanian territory. She starts talking online, on a dating site, with a Moldovan man, Alexei, from the village next to her village, separated by the border, which is a river, the River of Prut. They decide to meet at sunset, each of them being on the other side of the shores of the river. As he’s refused his visa entry to Romania, Alexei decides to cross the river in order to see Tincuta. While Tincuta is waiting at the river, Alexei is beaten to death by three Russians. As Alexei had told her that only if he was dead, he wouldn’t come to see her, Tincuta withdraws the conclusion that something bad had happened to him. She decides to swim across the river and find him, though she’s afraid of swimming…

 

DURATION: 12 mins


After moving to Montreal in 2014, I felt the need to enhance my writing and to express my feelings about my native country, thus the story of Across the River. When I was a child we used to live nearby the Moldavian frontier and we used to watch their tv programs and everything was in Romanian and it seemed awkward to me when my dad explained me that they were Romanians but that they were forced to live in a different country than ours. I was seeing from afar the lights of their houses and that territory was carrying a sort of mystery in it. I wrote the whole story while listening to a folkloric Moldavian song that guided my imagination to what was to become a tragic beautiful story at a separating river.

Across the River offers a modern and romantic insight about former and present conflicts between Romanians and Russians in the Republic of Moldova(former Romanian territory until 1945). The frontiers of this world keep on changing and within all these movements, all these readjustments, the people’s feelings stay the same. The same actions, the same loves, the same sensations, the same drives, the same fires, the same dances of seduction, the same shy steps and impetuosity. It is the eternal song of love, yet so refreshing, love which never gets old. It is that kind of love that doesn’t care about boundaries imposed by politics, by petty interests. We cannot deny the love existing between two lovers as we cannot deny the union of two territories that speak the same language, that have the same history and that pulsate at the same rhythm.



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